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Please Check Out The Articles About Milford Sound

History of Milford Sound

Maori people arrived in New Zealand from the Pacific Islands around 1,000 years ago. They travelled to Milford Sound overland – along the same route that the Milford Track follows today – in order to gain access to the greenstone rich region of Anita Bay. The Maori named the fiord ‘Piopiotahi’ meaning, ‘Place of the…

Geology, Flora and Fauna of Milford Sound

Wildlife found in Fiordland National Park Native Birds New Zealand is a land of birds – Kea, Tui, Kereru, Bellbirds, Pukeko and the Blue Ducks can be found in this remote wilderness. You are likely to come across a Kea as you drive along the Milford Road. Known as New Zealand’s alpine parrot, these birds…

Milford Discovery Centre & Underwater Observatory

The beauty of Milford Sound continues underneath the water. A stop at the Underwater Observatory allows visitors to descend 10.4 metres below the surface of the fiord, to witness the vibrant marine life in their natural thriving environment. The fully air-conditioned underwater viewing chamber provides a unique opportunity to view the real life ecosystem below…

The Milford Road

If you are making your own way to Milford Sound, allow plenty of time to enjoy the trip and check the road conditions before you go. The drive along the Milford Road is an experience in itself, with numerous short walks and photo opportunities along the way. Drive Times Queenstown to Milford Sound Queenstown is located 288km…

Milford Sound Weather

To view the latest weather forecast, click here. Escape to a rainforest spectacular – where the annual rainfall is measured in metres, rather than millimetres. Whatever the weather, it is certain that you will leave feeling inspired after a visit to Milford Sound. Famous for its steep cliff faces that come to life with thousands of…

About Milford Sound

Milford Sound is located at the northernmost end of Fiordland National Park on the South Island of New Zealand. Formed over time by the gradual erosion of ancient glaciers. The fiord stretches for 16km out to the Tasman Sea and is home to two permanent waterfalls – the Lady Bowen Falls and Stirling Falls. The…

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